DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev

Hmong Outfit Carolyn Chang

Hi Everyone! I’m pretty much all packed and I’m moving most of my stuff to San Jose this weekend. I finished two outfits but I probably won’t have time to do a shoot before I leave Fresno. I wanted to do a quick picture tutorial of how to sew sev plooj before I move. This is highly requested and I know people are going to request a video as well, but honestly recording is too much of a hassle for me to do myself and I don’t enjoy editing videos at all. So if you are waiting for a video it won’t happen because I tried and failed. I usually don’t finish that project and loose the drive to. Once grad school starts there will be less tutorials as I will be busy with school, work, and eventually committing to working out again. Last year, I made numerous outfits and that was one of my biggest excuses for not working out.

:: Sev ::

There a different types of sev or aprons. The type that I am showing today is sev plooj. Typically, White Hmong in Luang Prabang, Sayaboury, and Luang Namtha wear this type of apron. Traditionally the middle or plawv sev is a different color than the outside. Sometimes embroidery or paj ntaub is used in the middle was well. I try to make each section about the same size, but I usually prefer for the middle to much skinnier especially if I’m making a full length sev. If I know I’m just planning on wearing it with a skirt I tend to make my sev quite short anywhere from 18-22 inches long.

:: Instructions ::

1. For the lining pick a stiff fabric that creases well but don’t feel limited to doing so. I crease the edges of the lining before I sew the outside fabric onto it. I fold and sew by hand, but  you can turn good side to good side and sew and flip if you choose not to sew by hand. I personally never tried it but in in theory it should work. I try to have it be 9-10 inches wide and 20+ inches long. The length is up to your preference. Traditional sev are about 1 yard long. IMG_2975-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 2. Cut out the fabric that you will use for the outside. It should be about 4.25 inches wide and about 2 yards long depending on length (traditional you’ll need at least 2.25 yards). IMG_2980-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 3. Fold one edge as you sew it onto the lining. You can iron it all the way down too. IMG_2984-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 4. I usually leave excess to fold in at the top later. I start on the left side of the lining and work my way around using small stitches. For the top and middle section, cut a piece of fabric off the end. Center and sew IMG_2989-2-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 5. Now fold the bottom corners of the sev. I try to make a 45 degree angle.

Sev

6. Cut excess fabric from under the corner. This gets rid of the bulk.

Sev

Sev

7. Fold the sev in half and iron a crease down the middle

IMG_2991-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY

8. Center the middle of the sev and pin. Use large stitches to hold it in place
IMG_2993-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY

IMG_3047-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY

9. Fold the inner edge of the bottom portion of the sev in and baste stitch

IMG_3048-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY IMG_3050-e1547241121858-1024x768 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 10 . Fold the inner edges o the outer side of the sev and baste stitch

IMG_3052-768x1024 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY

11. Fold in the top pieces and hand sew

IMG_3006-e1547245023909-1024x768 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY
12.  Use the sewing machine to sew the middle section. I usually start from the corner. Make sure you sew in the same direction

IMG_3007-e1547245006446-1024x768 DIY :: How to Make a Hmong Apron / Sev DIY 13. Take out the baste stitches and attach fabric to tie it around the waist. 

Hopefully the pictures of the two different sev aren’t too confusing. I wanted to show with a plain middle and one with the paj ntaub. This is how I was taught to sew it and isn’t the only way. Apparently it’s prettier the flatter and thinner it is. I usually just iron it at the end and then fold it up for storage. If you are beginner use fabric with little stretch and that creases well. I prefer cotton.

 

 

Posted in DIY

Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads

Hmong Princess Hat

Hi, everyone! Fresno New Year is finally here. Today, I’m sharing my princess hat. This has been highly requested since I’ve been teasing with pictures and videos of the tedious process of making my very own. Honestly, it took me about a little over a month to make. First my pattern was too small and my 2nd attempt it was going to be too large but on my 3rd try I made it just right. I guess the Goldilocks method works.

Unfortunately, I won’t be making more of this hat or selling this hat. There are other vendors out there that sell a sequin princess hat just with less sequins. Like I’ve stated before it’s not profitable for me to sell, and in the upcoming months I simply won’t have the time. Stay tuned for my Fresno Hmong New Year!

A2A0675-683x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

But first, let’s take a couple of seconds to highlight this skirt. I special ordered this skirt from Nplias Lis Vaj because I wanted a tiered pleated maxi skirt with volume. Mostly for fun outfit ideas and on the rare occasions I want to wear something more modern even though deep down I prefer traditional.

A2A0676-683x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

:: Princess Hat ::

Originally I wanted multiple colored flower cap beads to match the pattern of the sequins of my hat but I couldn’t find more colors of the flower cap beads. Asia Supermarket in Fresno only had blue, orange, and pink. So sadly, I settled for blue which is still a little bit of win in my book since blue is my favorite color.

A2A0684-799x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

Princess Hats were popular in the late 80s and 90s. They usually consists of cross stitch embroidery, appliqué, and beads. I still have my childhood princess hat stored with some of my favorite outfits as child.

:: Basic Steps for Princess Hat ::

  1. Complete Embroidery
  2. Iron on interface
  3. (Apply sequins if needed)
  4. Bind the hat
  5. Sew trim on top
  6. Bead the hat
  7. Line the hat
  8. Sew the back of the hat shut
  9. Attach rows of beads in the middle of the hat if needed to help hat hold it’s shape

Also keep in mind the steps are more of a loose guideline. It’s how I made my hat but it’s not the only way. I forgot to take pictures of the entire process but here are a couple of closeups.

IMG_0211-copy-1024x768 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

IMG_0449-1024x768 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

After looking at some of the pictures, I might end up sewing the back a little bit more so the gap isn’t as big. Depends on if I have time before Hmong New Year.

A2A0696-643x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

:: Outfit Details ::

Princess Hat

Necklace/ Xauv

Sash/ Hlab 

Hmong Skirt/ Tiab (36 X 36)

A2A0679-683x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

Thank you for reading! As the year comes to a close, I want to acknowledge everyone who helped me with my various projects and those that gave me words of encouragement and criticism. I completed outfits while pushing some off to the distant future, and explored my sense of self. For me sewing is much more than making pretty things, it’s a form expression, an art form, and multiple opportunities for improvement. Documenting my journey is completely allows me to jog my memory so I don’t forget. Apparently, I’m not known to be minimalist. I might not be able to actively construct things but if there’s enough interest and content with my mediocre drawing skills- tutorials can continue. I still owe a couple pattern drafting tutorials as well. There will be a slight pause in Hmong Outfit Series posts.

A2A0702-683x1024 Hmong Princess Hat :: Sequins & Beads DIY HMONG

Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags

Hmong Leng Sam Neua

Hi, everyone! I have an epiphanous realization that I have prepared too many outfits for Hmong New Year. Some outfits are a part of my Hmong Outfit Series and others are part of my creative outlet. As I type this post, I see that my fabric purchases don’t seem to be twindling. There’s a lot of outfits on my list and I’m trying to finish them during my break because I won’t be able to sew for a while. Today, I’m sharing an outfit that I made inspired by the Hmong Leng Sam Neua. It’s not completely traditional but contains most of the pieces of Hmong Leng from this region. 

A2A0653-683x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

:: Hmong Leng Sam Neua ::

This group lives in Northeastern Laos near the Vietnam border in the province Sam Neua. They wear their hair in large hair buns like the Hmong Leng Dien Bien/ Lai Chau in Vietnam. I like the detail on the front of the shirt. The applique doesn’t run straight on both sides but zigzags on one side and the zig zag faces differently than the Hmong Leng of Thailand. It’s typically folded over, but I sewed mine flat on the front of the shirt. I opted to do this because I think it looks cleaner and I like it lying flat and flush against the shirt.

A2A0633-620x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

The shirt has black cuffs instead of the dark blue cuff like the Hmong Leng of Xieng Khouang, and Hmoob Moos Pheeb. Typically the sleeve is a full length sleeve. I did the appliqué of the shirt by hand and that was a very tedious process. My appliqué skills are also quite basic so it doesn’t look very pretty up close. Usually, in the very middle of the appliqué row  there is embroidery or appliqué triangles. I chose to embroider stars.

The video I linked below shows a Hmong girl getting dressed in the Hmong Leng Sam Neua style.

 

A2A0639-649x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

Like the various Hmong Leng groups of Laos their dab tsho is sewn face down. Instead of tying their sash, they wrap it around the waist multiple times. 

A2A0646-683x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

:: Skirt ::

The skirt that I’m wearing is not exactly authentic. It’s the closest skirt that I had in my collection to the Hmong Leng Sam Neua skirt. Hmong Leng Sam Neua wear skirts with rows of red appliqué in between the spaces of the batik design. Straight lines, zig zags, and criss crossing lines are appliquéd on the middle of the skirt.

A2A0658-773x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

Pictured below is an authentic skirt. My skirt lacks the red appliqué rectangles on the bottom of the skirt or the taw tiab/ taab tab. The bottom of the Hmong Leng Sam Neua skirt consists of cross stitch embroidery- usually yellow, orange, red, and white and appliqué. In-between the embroidery space is left to appliqué red rectangles.

IMG_1605 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

Maybe when I wear this outfit next year, I’ll take the time to put my hair up in a large hair bun.

A2A0642-683x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

Traditionally, this outfit pairs with leg wraps or nrhoob. Long triangles of hemp fabric dyed indigo are wrapped around the legs. Inwards for the living and outwards for the dead. I added some red ribbon on the top for decoration.

A2A0645-1024x921 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

A2A0611-683x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

:: Outfit Details ::

Hmoob Leng Sam Neua Outfit

Sash/ Hlab 

Hmong Skirt/ Tiab (38 X 18)

Leg Wrap / Nrhoob

A2A0625-666x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

:: Photography ::

Uncle Sai Photography

Thank you for reading! Merced New Year is here and I can’t wait for the grand finale of Fresno Hmong New year. It took me a while to decide which outfits to wear for Fresno Hmong New Year, but I’m proud to say I’m ready and no longer questioning my decisions. I can’t wait to share with you all my outfits for this year. If you want to see the outfits I wore last year click here. Next week, I’ll showcase my sequin princess hat!

A2A0656-683x1024 Hmong Outfit :: Red Appliqué & Zig Zags DIY HMONG

DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab

Hmong Hat Tutorial

Hi Everyone! I know I promised a mens shirt drafting tutorial but I might have to push until after Hmong New Year. Today I’m showcasing a little picture tutorial on a hat that I made. In a previous post I made a version that omitted the top flap so that I could have a huge bun  top. This headwrap has various names from Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab, Phuam Hmoob Lauj, and Phuam Ntswg.

:: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab ::

Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab is worn with a sev plooj outfit and also originated from the Lao province Luang Prabang. This headwrap however is different than the type that my family typically wears as show in this post. We wear phuam dai hlaws or (phuam dai paj which I didn’t grow up hearing as often).

Materials::

Black Aida 14 Count cloth

Cotton  (You can also use more textured material)

Jersey Fabric

Foam

Pom Poms

Tassels

Beads

Tutorial ::

IMG_1411-1024x768 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY

  1. I drew a little pattern on paper to trace out the shape on the foam. I think I made the highest peak a little high on mine. The pattern above is folded in half and based off my measurements. I left excess on the ends about 3 inches on each side.IMG_1428-e1544814072112-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY
  2. You’ll need two pieces of embroidery. I used a pattern that would match my outfit.
  3. Cut out black fabric that will be wrapped about the hat and for the flap. For the wrap portion, the length is about 60 inches and width is about 5 inches. The flap should be about 15 inches long and 9 inches wide. IMG_1452-e1544814097250-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY
  4. Sew embroidery onto black fabric and hand sew the back.
  5. Next, sew the black jersey fabric around the foam. I used a really thin foam about 1/4 of an inch. IMG_1453-1024x768 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY IMG_1454-e1544814231243-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY
  6. Then, overlap the two ends of the hat and sew.
  7. Position one end of the flap in the middle of the front of the hat and sew onto the jersey fabric.IMG_1460-e1544814321915-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY

Wrap the other piece around the hat so that the embroidery is centered across the forehead. Hand sew it onto the hat.IMG_1461-e1544814374367-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY 10. Now you are ready to decorate the hat with pom poms and tassels!

IMG_1468-e1544814477520-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY

IMG_1469-e1544814505185-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY

IMG_1470-e1544814539350-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Haum Vaj Sab DIY

Thank you for reading! The pom poms that I used were a little larger but I was too lazy to make new smaller pom poms. The other day I realized that I had too many outfits prepared for Hmong New Year this year but it’s okay I’m almost ready for next year. I can’t wait to wear this hat with the outfit that I’m making. So stay tuned for that outfit post in the next couple of months. Next week do you want to see my outfit based off of the Hmong Leng Sam Neua or my princess hat? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Posted in DIY

Miao Outfit :: Phoenix & Silver

Miao Outfit

Happy Thursday, everyone! Today I’m sharing a Miao outfit that I made last year. Originally I was going to wait until I finished a tutorial for the shirt, apron, and sash before posting the outfit, but I decided that if I waited it would probably take another year. Honestly, it’s not high on my priority list since I have a lot of Hmong outfits left to make. I still have to finish some outfits for Hmong New Year!

HOUA2866-683x1024 Miao Outfit :: Phoenix & Silver DIY

:: Miao ::

In the summer of 2017, I visited one of my best friends in China and explored parts of Yunnan and Guizhou province with her. I was inspired to make this outfit based off of some of the outfits that I saw. In the past posts, I featured Hmong outfits and this post doesn’t quite fall into that category. In China, the Miao are the 5th largest minority group and Hmong is one of the subgroups under Miao. The other three subgroups include the Hmu, Who Xiong,  and Ah Mao.

I remember walking through the streets of the Xijiang Miao Village and my friend asked me if I understood what the local people were saying. No I don’t. They speak a different branch of the Miao language and most of the words I didn’t understand.

HOUA2882-683x1024 Miao Outfit :: Phoenix & Silver DIY

:: Hmu ::

The heavily commercialized 10,000 Miao Village featured the Hmu sub group of Miao. They wear a lot of silver accessories and some are sewn onto their clothes. Silver is a sign of wealth. Some wear long skirts and others wear short skirts. I managed to bargain with one lady for a traditional long skirt outfit and accessories so I decided to make a short skirt version. The shirt is wrapped and tied on the side with the front of the shirt longer than the back. For Sacramento Hmong New Year I actually paired this outfit with a black skirt but I forgot to bring the black skirt to my photoshoot with Houa. The day of the shoot, I was rear ended so my mind was a little scattered.

In Datang, they wear dark blue pleated mini skirts! The skirts were super short but most wore shorts under and their leg wraps go much higher than what I’m used to seeing. Another outfit on my never ending list to replicate or acquire.
HOUA2916-683x1024 Miao Outfit :: Phoenix & Silver DIY

:: Outfit Details ::

Miao Outfit

Crossroads by Nancy White Pleated Skirt (37 X17.5)

HOUA2928-683x1024 Miao Outfit :: Phoenix & Silver DIY

:: Photography ::

Houa Vang Photography

Thank you for reading! I have a couple of shoots planned so stay tuned for more Hmong Outfit Series posts. I can wait to share some of my finished projects for Hmong New Year as well.

Posted in DIY

DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash

IMG_0188edit-768x1024 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

:: Hmong Sash ::

Happy Friday, everyone! Today, I’m sharing a tutorial on how to make a Hmong sash. I have a variety of sashes, traditional and modern. Some wrap around multiple times others just once. Some tied or pinned.

I made a modern sash but instead of the flat ends or tails, I wanted a gathered look in the back. Basically I wanted it to look like I was wearing two sashes that are tied but I didn’t want a knot in the back. This method allows me to take out the bulk.

:: Materials ::

Blue Sequin Fabric

Blue Chiffon Fabric

Interface

: Instructions ::

  1. For the waistband, cut the sequin fabric into a 54 inch by  8.75 inch rectangle.

    IMG_0174edit-731x1024 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

  2. Iron interface onto the wrong side of the fabric and leave a 3/8 inseam.
  3. Fold the waistband in half lengthwise and fold 3/8 of the top and bottom in.
  4. Cut 2 smaller rectangles from the sequin fabric and 2 smaller rectangles from the chiffon fabric.
  5. Hem the 3 edges and leave about an inch from the top of each rectangle.
  6. Gather the top of each rectangle.IMG_0177edit-1024x768 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

    IMG_0178edit-1024x768 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

  7. Place inside of of waistband and pin into place.

    IMG_0181edit-768x1024 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

    (Note: The waist band is the same color as the sequin tails, the lighting when I took the photo made it look kind of off)

  8. Sew the sides and bottom of waistband

    IMG_0188edit-768x1024 DIY :: How to make a Hmong Sash DIY HMONG

TIP: When working with this sequin fabric, make sure to use the slowest setting on your sewing machine. The sequins are glued onto the mesh so as the needle goes through the sequins it can get really hot and gummy. So work slow, use a longer stitch setting, and clean the needle often.

Thank you for reading my tutorial on how to make a Hmong sash! You can change the the dimensions based on your own measurements. I usually position the tails on the sash so that when wrapped around my waist, the end of the waistband ends on my side. This allows me to hide the end and then the sash looks pretty from the front and back! If I wear a hlab nyiaj on top it also hides it as well.

DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins

IMG_9782edit-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins DIY

Happy Thursday, everyone! It’s getting closer and closer to Hmong New Year and I still have countless endless projects to finish. I’m drowning in fabric and need to finalize which outfits I actually plan on wearing. Some outfits are for my Hmong Outfit Series and others I’ll save for another year. Today I’m sharing a couple of pictures of a Hmong hat that I made. It’s a modernized version of the phuam hmoob lauj. I plan on making a slightly more traditional version later and will make a little tutorial for that version.

IMG_9783edit-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj ::

This Hmong hat was pretty simple to make. I opted to take the top flap out because I wanted the top of the hat to be open for my hair. While making the hat I was debating on using bright colored yarn or pastel yarn to match my sequins. After going back and forth, I decided on more vibrant colors to look a little more mature but a little part of me still wants to make a pastel one.

IMG_9785edit-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins DIY

The pom poms that I used are a little different than the round ones. I just wanted some variation and for my second hat I’ll make some smaller round pom poms. Currently, I’m cross stitching an outfit and if I like it enough the hat for my tutorial will match. Unless, I have a change of heart and want to make an even more traditional version.

IMG_9763edit-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins DIY

Phuam Hmoob Lauj are usually worn with a sev plooj outfit which I have plenty of.  For my first attempt I used foam that was too thick so I switched it out for a thinner foam. It looks really pretty without foam as well.

IMG_9749edit-768x1024 DIY :: Phuam Hmoob Lauj & Sequins DIY

Thank you for reading! I wanted to update my blog before my trip. Make sure to follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Once I hit 300 likes on Facebook I’ll be hosting a little xauv giveaway.

Posted in DIY

Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue

Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci

DSC_0410final-1024x731 Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue DIY HMONG

Happy Thursday, everyone! Last summer I made a traditional hat or phuam paj shown in this post, and I decided to make another more glam version incorporating my favorite color blue. Adds a little bit of variation to my collection. DSC_0412final-1024x731 Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue DIY HMONG

:: Phuam Paj ::

This hat is based on phuam paj a type of head wrap worn by white Hmong that lives in the region known as Tsua Noog Roov towards the Khammoune region of Laos. My favorite thing to make besides making aprons specifically sev plooj are hats. They take a little bit more time but I enjoy the freedom to customize. It’s a liberating creative outlet. I can add little details and ensure quality.

DSC_0413finaledit-1024x731 Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue DIY HMONG

:: Floating Sequins ::

I love the vibrant colors that are showcased in traditional head wraps and now that paj ntaub cog ci is trending again I wanted to combine the two. My trick to making sequins pop and catch more light is to attach the sequins to the aida cloth with fishing line instead of thread.  I always found colored thread distracting, but most people don’t mind.

DSC_0418final-1024x731 Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue DIY HMONG

Usually the siv ceeb on the phuam paj is the regular black and white or sparkly black and white. I decided to add one with some blue to bring out the blue fringe of the hat. Additionally, I layered a sequin trim on top to add a little more shine to the hat. Now that I completed this hat, I need to work on finishing my other sequin outfits if I want to wear them this year for Hmong New Year. I have 2 left to make, but most likely I’ll finish one and save the other one for next year.

DSC_0415final-1024x683 Phuam Paj Ntaub Cog Ci :: Sparkly Sequins & Shiny Blue DIY HMONG :: Model ::

Ka Vang

Thank you for reading! Make sure to follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Once I hit 300 likes on Facebook I’ll be hosting a little xauv giveaway. Next update will most likely be another Hmong Outfit Series Post.

Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes

IMG_7900-683x1024 Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes DIY HMONG Hmong Outfit Series

Hi, Everyone! It’s been a while since my last post on the blog and my last update of my Hmong Outfit Series. I was busy traveling and working on this piece. This is my first time making a Stripe Hmong outfit and sequin outfit. I love how paj ntaub cog ci is coming back and trending and I wanted to do a couple of takes on it. Add a little twist while challenging myself.

During the process, I questioned my own thought process and weighed the pros and cons of making my own outfit. All in all the biggest thing that I get out of making my own outfit is the little pat on the back that I give myself and sense of accomplishment. I actually committed to my idea and followed through. Additionally, it’s like a fun puzzle for me and I’m rewarded with a semi decent outfit.

IMG_8010-672x1024 Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes DIY HMONG Hmong Outfit Series

:: Stripe Hmong ::

This outfit is based off Hmoob Txaij or Stripe Hmong from Sam Neua/Phongsali province in Laos. Their outfit is distinguished by the bands on their sleeves and they usually wear a heavier xauv than the Hmong in Sayaboury and Luang Prabang.This is one of my favorite xauv because of the tiers and slight tapering. It’s a more feminine take as the traditional xauv are heavier and can be a little bulky. I’ll show a traditional real silver one in a future post.

IMG_7958-683x1024 Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes DIY HMONG Hmong Outfit Series

I opted to make my outfit paired with a skirt for mostly aesthetic reasons and sheer laziness. Typically the outfit is worn with pants and the skirt is for special occasions or during burial rites. When paired with pants, there are two aprons with one in the back and one in the front. There are two sashes – usually pink and green and both are tied in the back. My sashes are a little long for my liking, I dressed myself for the photos and couldn’t adjust my sashes to my satisfaction. It always looks better when my mom helps me.

IMG_7978-676x1024 Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes DIY HMONG Hmong Outfit Series

This hat was a fun addition. Originally I was planning on buying one but I decided that it would only be fitting if I made one and added sequins! Honestly, I don’t even know if I made the hat correctly. I would probably make it better if I knew how it was traditionally wrapped.

IMG_8033-Edit-683x1024 Hmong Outfit Series :: Sequin & Stripes DIY HMONG Hmong Outfit Series

:: Outfit Details ::

Miao Silver Hair Accessories

Stripe Hmong Outfit

Sequin Sashes

Xauv

Crossroads by Nancy White Pleated Skirt (37 X17.5)

Thank you for reading! I wanted to update my blog before my trip. Make sure to follow me on Facebook and Instagram. Once I hit 300 likes on Facebook I’ll be hosting a little xauv giveaway.

:: Photography ::

Star Pictures Studio

Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins

Hi, everyone! Today I’m sharing pieces of the many projects that I’m currently working on and will eventually add to my Hmong Outfit Series on my blog. I love how vintage styles are coming back and I can’t wait to have some modernized paj ntaub cog ci outfits.

:: Sequins, Beads, & Fishing Wire ::

I’m almost done with the embroidery of the various sequin outfits that I have planned out this year. Adding the sequins is taking me longer than I expected but I tend to make my life a little more difficult by choice. I decided that it would be a bright idea to use fishing wire instead of a thread so that I wouldn’t have to see threads. Fishing wire is harder to work with but so far I like the result. For this outfit, I love how the sequins and beads catch the light.

:: Hmong Outfit ::

Here are a couple of pieces Hmong outfits that I ‘m working on.

Sequin-Stripe-1024x731 Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins DIY

I have 3 different sequin outfits in mind. Only planning on finishing 2 in time for Hmong New Year.

Blue-Sequin-1024x732 Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins DIY

My pile of trims for various shirts as well.

Fabric-and-Trims-1024x731 Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins DIY

I still have a tutorial that I have to finish filming and need to work on recording a voiceover.

:: Hmong Hats ::

With a plethora of outfits, I matching hats on my list of to do as well. I don’t own a phuam hmoob txaij but I’m basing mine on pictures. Honestly, I would save myself a lot of time if I just bought myself one but I tend to not be 100% satisfied with hats that I see a lot of vendors sell. I guess most of them don’t match the vision I have.  I’m waiting for my silver to arrive to add to my hat. Also, I’m still debating if I want to add a couple of pink pom poms to my hat or not. Let me know in the comments if you would be interested in a tutorial.

Phuam-Hmoob-Txaij-1024x731 Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins DIY

Sequin-Princess-Crown-1024x731 Sneak Peek :: Hmong Outfit & Sequins DIY

Thank you for reading! I’m trying my best to stay on top of my projects and updating my blog more regularly. I have a couple of trips planned so I just need to budget my time more effectively.

Posted in DIY